Interesting Myrtle Beach Golf Course Facts

All courses in Myrtle Beach have some unbelievable stories to tell. But, this is a little bit of “Did you know?” Several courses in Myrtle Beach have very interesting facts that you probably are not aware of. Get this…

Did you know?      The only out of bounds on Oyster Bay is the road on #18. On #17 (an island green), the oyster shells surrounding the green are considered part of the water hazard.

Did you know?      Thistle is the only course in Myrtle Beach that has twelve minute tee times. Most courses are seven, eight or nine minutes. They will also be opening one of the biggest and most technologically sound clubhouses in the area in the next weeks. Also, they average the largest greens at about 7,300 square feet each.

Did you know?      World Tour has the largest green in Myrtle Beach. It is #9 on the Open nine and is a little over 18,000 square feet. This is the hole that resembles #18 at St. Andrews.

Did you know?      Grande Dunes is the longest course in Myrtle Beach. From the tips, it reaches seven thousand, six hundred and eighteen yards. That’s longer than the U.S. Open!!! I think Tiger still would have won…

Did you know?      Blackmoor has a graveyard on #13. It dates back to 1839 and it rests a plantation family and their slaves.

Did you know?      Farmstead is right on the North Carolina / South Carolina border. 22% of the course is in SC and the other 78% is in NC. On #10 you tee off from NC to SC. If only you could hit it to Georgia…

Did you know?      Heritage has two graveyards. One is on #8 and rests slaves and off the tee of #4 are the settlers that owned the land.

Did you know?      Bald Head Island has no OB. There are no cars allowed on the island; only golf carts are allowed. There are alligators and deer on the island, but how did they get there? Well, during low tide, the deer and alligators can move easily from island to island and eventually end up on Bald Head. And this might be the best we’ve heard… Bald Head Island got its name from the days of Blackbeard. That’s right, the pirate. You see, when low tide would come around, ships would consistently run aground, Blackbeard knew this happened all too often and the ships were there for the taking. Word spread to beware of the “bald head”. Blackbeard’s men would scalp stranded sailors when they raided the grounded ship. Hence, it is named Bald Head Island.

Now you know…

Myrtle Beach Golf Directors
807 Sea Mountain Hwy B
North Myrtle Beach, SC 29582
(843) 249-5800
https://www.myrtlebeachgolfdirectors.com
info@myrtlebeachgolfdirectors.com